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So, I'm about 100 pages into All The Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders, and I decided to look up more info on the wonderful author I was enjoying.

Only at this point did I realize that Anders is trans. This seems huge to me. I heard about the work of a trans woman without ever having the work sold to me as a "oh you'll like 'cause your trans". No, instead I was just like who was up for the Nebulas this year, and started reading.

Briar Rose @polymerwitch
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So, much media by trans folx (especially trans women) is wrapped up in trans labels. When was the last time you read or saw something about Laverne Cox for example that didn't mention the fact that she is trans? What about Fallon Fox?

It's so nice to see another trans persons work just standing on it's own and being brilliant without a bunch of cis folx throwing trans labels all over them. (This may have happened, but it was at least a lesser amount to the extent that I didn't notice it).

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@polymerwitch the only person that has come close to breaking from the label is Wendy Carlos, but I think it's because she isn't afraid to fight like hell.

@craigmaloney @polymerwitch I think it will take more of us in the limelight until the novelty wears off

@polymerwitch
There are two sides to this. On one hand queer writers should just be seen as writers. On the other, being seen as such usually requires ignoring the experience of being queer and writing solely about cishet people. It's the attitude that being queer isn't normal that has to change.

@kittybecca @polymerwitch yeah. in my work, my approach has always been "i'm going to write about what i'm writing about, including being queer/trans/IS, and queer/trans/IS rhetorics and experiences, openly *and* i demand that my work be taken as seriously as any cithet (and frequently cishet and male) author's work is"

this isn't a guarantee of success, at least individually :p but i've never written solely for self-gain, anyway

@shoutcacophony
it's the only honest way to write; anything else merges with respectability politics
@polymerwitch

@shoutcacophony
being invisible or near invisible is hardly advancing the literary prestige of queer people
@polymerwitch

@polymerwitch @shoutcacophony
you notice no one ever says "I had no idea Shakespeare was cis"

@shoutcacophony @polymerwitch he writes so well, you'd almost think he was a normal person!!

@polymerwitch @shoutcacophony i've got a poem about this ironically coming out in a queer issue of a journal called Rabbit: A Journal of Nonfiction Poetry

"This Poem Is Coming Out As A Trans Poem"

it addresses a lot of this stuff. i can't wait until the issue is out, then i'll put it up online and share it here.

@shoutcacophony @polymerwitch apparently it launches tomorrow, so if i have time i'll put the poem up

@kittybecca @polymerwitch Please do!

I'm in a complicated place around submissions, having self-published for years -- I do have a new collection coming out (heh) as part of an album I've been working on. I've gone the tradidtional route too.

I figure if I'm not getting paid for submissions (or a stipend-like amount that becomes negative income in practice), and potentially more people will read it if it's "distributed" on Bandcamp, especially those who likely wouldn't have otherwise...why not

@shoutcacophony @polymerwitch what i've been doing is submitting to traditional journals, then self-publishing collections of what i land in those journals

i also make them cc-zero and make them reader sets price on smashwords. a couple people have paid for my latest collection; one paid $30 and the other paid $20, which was great. i've also been submitting way more often to journals that give honorariums, though.

@kittybecca @polymerwitch

Interesting. I had someone tell me that the (soft) bound thesis I put together was worth $20 to them, based on both content and aesthetics/look of the book itself.

It's interesting what people will pay for and not, depending on context, etc.

Encouraging to hear that people will pay for poetry on Smashwords. I'd been presuming that was a dead end.

@kittybecca @polymerwitch

It's been a while since I checked honorarium-based journals/awards. The ones I saw in P&W at least seemed generalist enough that I presumed that it would be more like needle in a haystack once the review proces started, as well as a lot of my work being experimental enough to not fit within scope

@kittybecca @polymerwitch The process as a whole was good, though. I got two residencies with stipends (one for travel and tuition/fees, the other had an honorarium), had a few pieces published, and was wait-listed for a well-known residency. I definitely can't complain.

@shoutcacophony
I just won a hundred dollar prize though which I never expected, lol. Otherwise I get between 10 and 30 a piece.
@polymerwitch

@polymerwitch @shoutcacophony
Here's the 120 dollar poem (20 for the original publication and a hundred for the prize): maryjournal.org/winter2017/the *shrug* it's all about sending stuff out and if they reject it they reject it, for me

@kittybecca @polymerwitch That's interesting! that seems like it'd be a lot easier than the traditional way of sending out some work, then waiting 2-6 months. especially if the journal has a "no multiple submissions" policy. boo in it being subscription-based, though

@shoutcacophony
It's still just a database of journals, but with lots of statistics and info
@polymerwitch

@kittybecca @polymerwitch True -- still though, seems like it could be useful, at least for me. Wading through submissions guidelines is a chore, and sometimes they're vague on the details as well

@shoutcacophony
I use Duotrope. Sadly it's subscription-based; when it started it was free.
@polymerwitch

@kittybecca @polymerwitch "Mr. Shakespeare, how does your being cis relate to the human condition?"

Translation: "Tell us how this relates to being queer, because fuck if I know what you're on about regarding royalty and fidelity and such"

@kittybecca @polymerwitch exactly. it also opens up possibilities: it's a lot more than just "upending the canon" (although that can be interesting and fun), or "write what you know", it makes new rhetorics possible

examples:

trans/post-gender: kari edwards, "Iduna", "A Day in the Life of P"

POC: Harryette Mullen, "Sleeping with the Dictionary"

POC/Mixed/Bi(?) (don't recall): Eleni Siklianos, "The California Poem"