I'm considering setting up a Masto instance specifically for political discussion.

It would not, repeat not, be a "free speech" instance. I would still expect users to obey the spirit of the TC CoC -- basically, no harassment or microaggressions -- but it would be ok not to CW political posts, and some language would be acceptable there which might be considered unacceptable here on TootCat!classic.

I'm inclined to also have firmer strictures there against spreading disinformation.

TootCat!classic (i.e. here) would probably silence the instance, just to keep pol stuff out of the fedi timeline.

(n.b. all of this is only necessary because Masto/Glitch somehow still doesn't support discussion groups. :kestraglow:​)

I'm interested in hearing thoughts on this, from both TC and non-TC folk.

cc: @news

@woozle sounds like a good idea to me :)
I still hope for 's Collections in Mastodon though, as that also could kinda solve this issue.

I really miss being able to categorise my posts, and indicating which categories/Collections should be included in my default timeline, and being able to opt-out or opt-in to specific categories of a user.

Mastodon's filters and CW come a long way, but it still doesn't allow you to apply filters to individual users.

@FiXato Collections and/or Communities... what were Collections? I'm not sure I ever made use of that feature...

...but yeah, why does the flow of basic features seem to have stopped since 2018 or so? [Frowny-pouty-skeptical face.]

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Google Plus Collections (long post) 

@woozle within your profile you could create one or more Collections.
Basically just a topic or label combined with a colour, title, description and header image that you could optionally assign to a post (though a post could only be part of a single collection).
Here's an archive overview for example of my "Google+ Exodus" collection near the end of GPlus's lifetime: web.archive.org/web/2019020619

Only your own posts could be assigned to your collections, though of course you could just reshare someone else's post with or without a description to your collection.

You could also configure which posts a follower by default would see in their home timeline when they followed you:

  • all your posts
  • ↳ all your posts not belonging to a collection
  • ↳ or all your posts not belonging to a collection plus those that are part of the collections you've selected.

So, when a user would follow your account, they'd always subscribe to the posts that were not part of a collection, and then also to those collections you've indicated would be auto-subscribed to.
Alternatively they could opt-out of your defaults, or opt-in to those you choose to not automatically subscribe.

They could also subscribe to just individual collections.

I think the unwritten rule was that you'd not automatically subscribe followers to sensitive collections such as politics-related things.

At the top of my archive profile you can see some of the collections I had on : web.archive.org/web/2019030804

Personally I found this feature really useful for certain users, especially for fandom related topics. It meant I could for example follow their Gaming or Doctor Who related posts, but not their political views or shitpost garbage.

Oh, and looking at the documentation still only for Google Currents (GPlus for rebranded), you were also able to limit collections to certain Circles, and you could toggle notifications per collection.

This video is from a G Suite GPlus user, but it does a decent job at showing what they were and how they could be used: youtube.com/watch?v=wqBAr-h1wN

re: Google Plus Collections (long post) 

@woozle s/still only/still online/
showing that I also miss being able to edit a post without having to go through the delete & redraft process...

re: Google Plus Collections (long post) 

@FiXato Oh right! I remember now. I had a few of those, and I remember posting to them some. I think maybe I was never clear on how they worked; your explanation is good.

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Toot.Cat

On the internet, everyone knows you're a cat — and that's totally okay.